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Wednesday, February 2, 2011

Lunar New Year Fair @ Victoria Park

Lunar New Year Fair, or pre-New Year Fair, usually run for a seven-day period that ends on New Year Eve in the Lunar calendar (i.e. today, for 2011). Entrepreneurs set up stores that offer food, goods and Chinese New Year plants. It is a Chinese tradition to attend these New Year Fair as a family, to purchase little gifts for the children, plants for home or just to browse and have fun.

Chinese God of Fortune at the Lunar New Year Fair at Victoria Park, Hong Kong

There are usually around 12 to 15 Lunar New Year Fair scattered across Hong Kong each year. The Lunar New Year Fair at Victoria Park at Causeway Bay has always been the largest and the center of attention.


These temporary fairs are usually set up on public owned concrete football or basketball courts. Entrepreneurs are required to bid for their desired locations several months prior to the fair. There is usually a mix of experienced shop owners, as well as small groups of High School or University students who are eager to develop their entrepreneurial skills. They would work in teams, acquire or design unique products (e.g. plastic decors or soft toys etc) that are related to the Chinese Zodiac of the coming year.

Plants at the Lunar New Year Fair

Plants at the Lunar New Year Fair

This year is the Year of the Hare, or the Year of the Rabbit. It is not a surprise an overwhelming number "rabbit" products for sale. Amongst those are Angry Bird toys and the Facebook "Like" thumb soft toy.

One of the two food stores at the Lunar New Year Fair

Posters of "good fortune"

The rent of the two food stores at the fair would usually raise a few eye brows. The final bid would usually be over $400,000 HK for the 7 day period. This year, the controversy went to a store set up just for promoting an up coming R18 pornographic movie in 3D. Apart from having giant posters, the store offers blow-up toys and mouse pad in the shape of breasts. It has certain created noise and added colour to the fair, especically in this pseudo-traditional Chinese society.

Lunar New Year Fair at Victoria Park